“How much money do you have?” asked the ten year old boy. “Oh, I am very rich.” replied my grandmother.

My grandmother is one of the most grace-filled, joyful, sweet women I know. Sound familiar? While this phrase might sound typical of grandmothers, she has every right—humanly speaking—to be a bitter and depressed woman. It is amazing how much grace she has for others as a result of God’s grace for her.

She hopes to turn 100 years-old this next spring. She has lived through two World Wars and the Great Depression. She did not receive a high school diploma, but saw all of her five children receive college degrees. She lost a daughter who was in her twenties, a son who was in his forties, and her husband to cancer when in their seventies. In every way, humanly speaking, my grandmother should be cold, bitter, and angry with God and His world.

So why not be bitter? She has chosen joy in the strength of the Lord (Neh 8:10). She is ruthlessly focused on finding strength in joy of the Lord and sharing it with others. Into her late 80s and early 90s she was still distributing devotionals to neighbors and friends. She continues to this day to share grace with others as she has been extended grace by her heavenly Father.

My grandmother’s prayer life is unbelievable. Throughout her life she has prayed daily and in part specifically for her family and grandchildren by name. One of the most important parts of her prayer life has been praying for our faith in Jesus to grow. She prays for each us to know our God and know how much grace He extends.

“How much money do you have?” asked the ten year old boy? “Oh, I am very rich.” replied my grandmother. “I am so rich because I have many children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren who believe in the Lord.” That ten year old boy didn’t get the answer he wished for and he hurried off to play.

I am so appreciative of the vision of grace my grandmother has modeled for my parents, myself, and now my children. As I reflect on our theme of being Rooted in Christ and Growing in Grace—I am grateful for grace extended to me and modeled by generations before me. Thanks grandma!